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New dimension in nanoparticle research | EU Research article

New dimension in nanoparticle research | EU Research article

News 28 September 2017 301 hits Anna May Masnou

One of the projects of Dr. Anna Laromaine, ICMAB researcher in the Nanoparticles and Nanocomosites Group (NN), is featured on EU Research Digital Magazine. The article focuses on one of her projects involving the synthesis and evaluation of nanoparticles in 3D environments: 3DinvitroNPC. 

"Evaluating the biological effects of nanoparticles is a hugely complex task, and it is not commonly performed in great depth and in a cost-efficient manner. The 3DinvitroNPC project has exploited a 3-dimensional method of assessing the viability and functionality of nanoparticles for medical applications" Dr. Anna Laromaine explains in the article. 

"The idea behind the project is that instead of evaluating nanoparticles on a 2D cell culture, we will develop a 3D cell culture and in vivo simple biological structures"

The core goal of the project is to develop a platform to test nanoparticles, based on Dr. Laromaine’s previous experience in developing 3D cell scaffolds. To this end, Dr. Laromaine and her team are using aerogels based on biodegradable polymers, and the model organism C. elegans.

With this project, they can address issues that are critical for the application of nanoparticles in biomedicine, such as toxicity or biodistribution of nanoparticles. 

If you want to know more about this project, you can read the whole article here

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